Linkage Love

By Kristen Abell

As I write this, I’m home sick with some stupid summer cold, so I apologize if my wit is less than stellar today – it’s being numbed by the crud in my head. But anywho, onto the links…

I know it’s a little late for job search info for many of you, but I found a couple links that I couldn’t help but share that might be of great assistance for your next (or ongoing) job search.

ApplyMate is a tool that helps you track applications, interviews, search status, etc. Although I haven’t used it, I think I certainly would have appreciated it when I was fresh out of grad school. Back then, my organization system consisted of a divided folder.

And although this post on gadgets for the job search is directed more towards faculty, I think there’s several gadget suggestions in here that would be extremely useful for SA folks – and not just for interviewing. Things I’m thinking of getting for my next presentation: a remote – seriously, I can’t believe I don’t already have one. I’d also add a hotspot – those things are priceless in wireless dead zones.

For those of you that are big list makers (I know you’re out there – there’s plenty of Type A folks on #SAChat), here’s a new idea:  to-stop list. You know those pesky little things that keep distracting you from getting all your to-dos done? The to-stop list idea suggests putting all of those on a list, thereby leaving time and brain space to get your real to-dos done. My only question is, what if my to-do list is a combination of to-dos and to-stops? I think I might be out of luck.

And last but certainly not least (it’s a short list today, I know – sorry about that, the head is not doing well), this little ditty courtesy of Brenda on designer QR Codes. Alright, maybe you won’t find it nearly as interesting or geekishly cool (what? That’s a word, isn’t it?) as we did, but you have to admit, it would be pretty sweet to have a QR code that looks like it’s made of M&Ms or wine. Oooh, or Legos, or like an Apple logo, or – well, this could go on forever.

Hope you enjoyed today’s Linkage Love. Remember, you can always submit link suggestions to us in the comments below – we’d love to see what you’re reading!

Linkage Love

Linkage Love

By Kristen Abell

Welcome to the new year of Linkage Love on the Student Affairs Women Talk Tech blog. We have a few links to get you started on the path to a happy tech and student affairs year (duh) today. Let us know if you have more you think we should add in the comments below.

Have you started using QR codes yet? I have to admit, I’m pretty geeked that I just worked with our publicity folks to create the first brochure at UMKC (I think) to feature a QR code for our housing department. Well, now you can set up a profile complete with QR code to feature just you. I know someone who will be checking this out in the near future…

Since I think it’s pretty darn important to get your staff out there and advancing themselves, I was a big fan of this post on ACUHO-I’s blog. I’m a big believer in being a stepping stone on the path of our staff – not always the end-point. I think this post promotes being a strong stepping stone…perhaps of the escalator type.

While the writer of this post at Inside Higher Ed sort-of admits to the decks being stacked against women when it comes to dress, the fact that she then goes on to dissect every last wardrobe choice a woman can make in regards to the MLA interview drove me absolutely crazy. If you recognize this as an issue, why not push interviewers to be more open-minded instead of supporting the fact that women, and not men, are judged on how well their suit fits, whether they’re wearing the “right” kind of shoes, etc. This is one of my biggest pet peeves – that women are consistently judged more critically on appearance than men. Let’s work on not perpetuating this, shall we?

For an excellent take on the Facebook-placenta debate occurring, check out Julie Larsen’s post on BreakDrink. This has long been my belief around judicial cases (or other such cases) that involve Facebook or other types of social media – that many of the professionals and faculty making the decisions in these cases are not familiar enough with these media to make an unbiased decision. Instead, they revert to the over-used “kids today” argument and tend to judge more harshly than they would if it were something occurring within a medium in which they were comfortable. Well done, Julie. (For some more info about judicial procedures and this case, check out Eric Stoller’s blog post on Inside Higher Ed).

And that concludes this week’s edition of Linkage Love. What links have you been checking out this week?

Linkage Love